Diagnosis: I Don’t Give a S#@% about myself

One of the most frustrating things I encounter at work is trying to help people who doesn’t want to help themselves.

Here are the 10 top clinical signs (for the novice):

1. The beautifully tanned patient who is sunburnt all over, (looking like he/she has just spent their weekend on the beach), and is about to go into the operating theatre to have a melanoma excised.

2. An obsession with blenders. The lap band is tight to maximise weight loss, the patient is supposed to be on a portioned healthy vitamised liquid diet. Instead, he lives on a  ‘vitamised diet’ of Big Mac and French Fries, liquified via a blender. ‘I just don’t understand why I am not losing weight…

3. The dangerous oxygen tank. The patient who just had 1/2 of his right lung removed for cancer – so now he is dependent on oxygen – lighting up a cigarette in the hospital courtyard. Taking a drag on their cigarette in between inhaling a whiff of oxygen from their mask. Honestly – if you want to kill yourself, that’s ok, but to blow up the hospital???

4. An X-ray that shows a new fresh hand fracture through plates and screws over an old fracture. Excuse: ‘Well, punching my fridge is better than punch my Dad in the face, rght?’

5. The MIA patient. The patient was called for the operating room, but he couldn’t be found anywhere. Because he was outside for his ‘last smoke’ before having half f his lip removed for  lip cancer. ‘You only told me that I couldn’t eat or drink before my anaesthetic, you didn’t say I couldn’t smoke.’

6. Patients with bags of ‘unfilled’ medication scripts. One is really unsure as whether these patient don’t take their prescribed medications (for their heart disease, cholesterol, diabetes, infections etc), because they can’t be bothered, they don’t want to or they just ‘don’t believe in taking medications.’

7. DNA’s (did not attend). Patients who have appointments for their cancers to be assessed and removed do not turn up to their appointments despite multiple phone calls, or simply, they have important work-commitments or holidays and need to move their appointment to 6 months later when things are quiet (and the cancer will be inoperable.)

8. The broken plaster on a broken arm. Sometimes, the non-existent plaster on a broken arm. ‘I know my arm is broken, but it got so itchy I had to take the plaster off’.

9. The gigantic fungating cancers. It takes time for cancers to grow. When I see a very very large cancer, I wonder why patients don’t come in when it was the size of a coin. Once I had a patient with a skin cancer on his chest. It was the size of a dinner plate, and it had already eaten into his breast bone. I asked him why he left it until now to come, he said that he only came in because it was growing into his neck and he couldn’t hide it behind his business shirt and tie at work anymore. Did he know it was a cancer? Yes, but he was too busy at work to take time off for an operation.

10. The smoker with a cigarette dangling out of his neck. The throat cancer patient who had his throat removed now has to breathe out of his tracheostomy. He was found lighting up with a cigarette taped to his tracheostomy. A short-cut highway of delivering poisons directly into his lungs. Well, I guess he won’t get oral cancers from smoking this way.

The Differential Diagnoses:
1. I have a severe case of NFI (No F&%$* Idea)
2. I am so f$%#@ scared that I’d rather bury my head in the sand
3. My health is my doctor’s responsibility because that’s their job to fix it

But sometimes we just have to face the harsh diagnosis of: I don’t Give a Shit about Myself.

 

7 thoughts on “Diagnosis: I Don’t Give a S#@% about myself

  1. #7 and #9 made me laugh out loud. Holy shit! At what point do you take cancer seriously? I’d likely crap my pants if I HAD CANCER GROWING ON MY CHEST! My sister-in-law is an oncologist and so many times she treats the obese chain smoker who asks “why me?” like they had no idea that poisoning your body for decades might have some consequences.

    • Hello John! I know. Lack is insight or rather, denial of insight is inherent in some people. I do have to remind myself several times each day that it’s not my place to judge! I can be more patient than the patient 😀 Haha.

        • I’ve heard of surgeons voicing displeasure, or out right refusing, to perform an organ transplant due to a patient refusing to change their unhealthy ways. Is this possible or is this just some patient/media hyperbole?

          • Certain procedures have a criteria checklist that patients have to meet before they are deemed suitable. Some criterias are things they have no control over e.g. Asthma, some are things they do. Organ transplantation is one of the most stringent in regards to this.
            The sad things is, some patient accept the decision when they are turned down for an operation, whilst some look for ways to blame everyone else except themselves. I once turned down a patient because she was morbidly obese and a smoker. She reported me to the equal opportunities commission to say that I discriminated against her because she was fat and a smoker. I wrote back (to the horror of my lawyer) that yes it is true. But it is a clinical discrimination because scientific evidence show that in fat smokers, this operation posed more risks than benefit. I refused to do harm to the patient. I never heard from them again.

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